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The huge temple area sprawled out over acres of ground, much of it in a level courtyard paved with stone hauled, at considerable expense, from the distant quarries of Akkad.

To his left were two flat-roofed buildings that housed the numerous priests who served the gods of Ur; a third building was devoted to the multiple activities of the temple, including the lucrative temple prostitution business.

Dominating everything, however, was the huge ziggurat that rose high into the air. It was the highest structure Abram had ever seen, and he always felt a sense of awe as he approached it.

He paused for a moment, looking up at the huge steps and remembering what he had been taught—that this ziggurat was relatively new.

It had been built upon older temples, which time had eroded, and the remains of which had gradually grown upward in a mound. The steps had been added, and now the sunbaked bricks of the structure glistened as they caught the rays of the sun.

Abram stopped beside the god of water, Enki. He bowed low before the shrine and then dropped down to his knees. He prayed fervently to the stone god, which stood six feet high with wings spread as if they were arms.

Because the Chaldees lived in fear of both prolonged drought and severe floods, Enki was one of the more important deities, often glorified in sculpture and sacred verse.

Abram opened his eyes and read the inscription on the base supporting the idol: When I draw near unto the yellowing fields, grain piles are heaped at my command.

Abram prayed aloud, Oh, most powerful Enki, send no floods to wipe our fields away, and yet send rain so that the crops may grow. He continued to pray for some time, and his voice rose unconsciously as he worshiped this stone god of Ur, in the manner that he had been taught by his parents.

Finally he rose and made his way past other gods, each occupying their own shrines. The temple contained no fewer than three thousand deities; almost every element—including rain, sun, and wind—was represented by its own god.

The gods, however, were not considered equal. The most powerful was An, ruler of the heavens. Often considered his wife, and queen of the universe, was the fertility goddess, Ishtar.

It was to this idol that Abram now made his way. When he entered the interior of the ziggurat, he was impressed, as always, by the magnificence of it.

Artists had covered the walls with paintings, and sculptors had adorned the inside with many statues. Most of the men depicted in the wall murals had long, curling beards and long hair parted in the middle.

They were bare chested and wore skirts drawn in severely at the waist. The women on the frescoes wore their hair in braids coiled around their heads.

Abram passed by many of these sacred paintings, pausing from time to time to offer a brief prayer. When he arrived at the goddess Ishtar, he prostrated himself before the statue, which was made in the form of a beautiful woman wearing a clinging robe, with eyes wide and staring.

Abram began praying vehemently. Two men approached, one wearing the garments of a high order of the priesthood. His name was Rahaz, the high priest of the temple.

No more than medium height, he was vastly overweight. Even at the age of sixty there were no lines in his face, which was as smooth as marble.

He was completely bald, and his skin glowed with the oil he had anointed himself with. Though not attractive, he had an authority about him.

He stopped, as did the priest by his side—a tall, thin man with a name as short as he was tall, Huz. Yes, I see him. Rahaz was gazing steadfastly at the prostrate Abram.

He listened as the young man cried out loudly to the goddess and examined the worshiper as if he were a rare insect. Indeed, Rahaz had come to consider most of the populace who dwelt in Ur and the farms roundabout as nothing more than insects.

Earlier in his life he had known human compassion, but he had lost that virtue along the way as he had become more and more entrenched in the despicable life of the temple priesthood.

The generous offerings given to the temple granaries had made religion powerful and persuasive, a power that mostly benefited the priests and their temples.

For the people who faithfully brought their oblations, the religion of Ur offered no hope of freedom from their servile existence.

According to the generally accepted story of creation, the gods had fashioned people out of clay for the sole purpose of using them as slaves.

Anyone who failed to appease these deities with offerings would be subject to catastrophes, such as floods or pestilences or raids by neighboring tribes.

Such calamities frequently did occur, and Rahaz was always happy when they did. It meant that the people would bring even more offerings to increase the wealth of his kind.

Rahaz, however, did not smile. Three thousand gods are not enough for him. Huz was shocked. He had never heard of such a thing.

Most people complained that there were too many gods. Fanatics never know what they want. Rahaz bit off his words.

A god all his own, I suspect. His grandfather was exactly like him. Nahor—he was before your time. Yes, Abram has a brother with the same name as their grandfather.

But it is Abram who is more like the grandfather. Always asking questions. Demanding answers. It ought to be, but it causes trouble for us.

What we want are people who will bring their offerings, worship one of the gods—whichever one pleases them—and keep their mouths shut.

Abram had heard none of this conversation as he worshiped before the goddess Ishtar. But now as he rose and turned to leave, he saw the two priests.

He smiled and rushed over to them. Do you have time to answer some questions? I have several. Greetings, Abram.

I suppose I can spare a moment. He nodded to Huz, who scurried off at the unspoken command. Rahaz turned to Abram and thought carefully.

The family of Terah was wealthy and powerful and needed to be appeased. Come along, he said. Rahaz led Abram through a maze of corridors until he finally stopped and waved toward a seat in a pleasant room filled with comfortable furnishings.

The room was located on one of the outer walls of the ziggurat, and an open window allowed in sunlight and air.

A female slave, one of the temple prostitutes, entered the room at once and smiled brilliantly at Abram, who averted his eyes uneasily at her brazen stare.

Rahaz jumped in briskly. Bring us some wine, girl. Lowering his heavy body into a chair, he turned to Abram as she left and asked, Will you have something to eat?

No, thank you, master. But I do have some questions. What is your question? When a man commits a wrong, does it matter which one of the gods he confesses it to?

It was a question most dwellers of Ur would never think to ask. Rahaz cleared his throat and replied, The important thing is to bring an offering and make your confession.

Nonetheless, he urged himself on, muttering under his breath, and scurried down the narrow, twisting streets. He knew them well, having spent all of his forty years within the city walls.

He rarely stepped outside the gates into the open land, preferring the close comfort of the crowded houses, bazaars, and shops.

The security of being around people was necessary for Eliphaz. He loved nothing better than the festival days when the farmers brought their produce and the city swarmed like a giant anthill.

Rounding a corner, Eliphaz halted at the sight of a large yellow dog emerging stiff-legged from the gathering shadows, his lips pulled back from his teeth.

Eliphaz clasped the box he was bearing to his chest and backed up against the nearest wall. The animal continued forward, his eyes glittering.

Two street urchins, no more than ten or twelve, were scuffling in the dust. Seeing Eliphaz shrinking against the wall, the boys grinned and pointed.

Heaving a sigh of relief, Eliphaz hurried on down the street. Humiliated by the scene, he purposed that the next time he ventured out at dusk, he would bring one of his slaves with a weapon.

By the time Eliphaz reached the house he was seeking, the sun was disappearing below the top of the city wall. Eliphaz entered the courtyard of the large house, which was set back from the street.

Even in the growing darkness, he could see the lush greenery of the plants in decorated clay pots. He was a wiry fellow, below average height, who grinned and bobbed his head as he approached the visitor.

Am I late? Hazil turned, his hand on his hip, studying the man as he disappeared. Then he laughed softly and entered the house again himself, walking down a long corridor toward the cooking area.

An oven half buried in the earth was sending up tendrils of smoke, which swirled about the dried onions and vegetables hanging from the ceiling.

On one side of the room a woman was slicing vegetables with a knife, her back to Hazil. He threw his arms around her full figure, laughing when she shrieked.

No sooner had she turned than he planted a kiss on her mouth, shutting off her objections, then stepped back and plucked a piece of roasted meat from a dish on the table.

Although she was no longer in the flush of youth, her thin face was still attractive. He chewed it, then reached for another before answering.

With grape juice running over his chin, he grinned. Mahita laughed softly and feigned annoyance. What is it? After all, his future son-in-law is here.

You think Hanna will have this one? Without hesitation she nodded. These two were well aware of the innermost secrets of the house of Garai, as were all the servants.

Their master and his family labored under the delusion that the servants were all deaf. They must, then, in the outset, show us clearly the end proposed, and establish, not conjec-turally, not hypothetically, but scientifically, that the end is good, and, therefore, one which it is lawful to seek.

What, then, is the specific end they propose? They answer generally, not specifically. Their answer, as we collect it, is, - " The end we propose is, to remove the obstacles which now hinder the fulfilment, and to gather round man the circumstances which will enable him to fulfil, his destiny on this globe ; or, in a word, to enable man to fulfil the purpose of his present existence.

The good of a being is its destiny, or the end for which it exists ; and to seek to enable a being o fulfil its destiny, or gain that end, is to seek its good.

So the end for which man exists in this world is his good in relation to his existence here ; and to labor to enable him to gain that end is to labor for his good, and his only good here.

Thus far, we have, and can have, no quarrel with the Associationists. But a general answer to a specific question is no answer at all ; for the general has formal existence only in the special.

To answer, To remove evil, and to secure good, is not enough ; for the question remains, What is evil?

Evil, you say, is that which prevents, or in some way hinders or retards, the fulfilment of one's destiny. Very true ; but what is it that does that?

This is the question we want answered. It is fair, then, to say, that poverty and unattractive labor are evils, in the judgment of the Associationists.

Labor itself they cannot regard as evil, because they propose to continue it in their new world. The evil, then, is in its unattractiveness,-that is, in our being bound or forced to labor against our inclinations, or to do that to which we are more or less averse.

But this can be evil only on condition that it is an evil to be under the necessity of acting against our inclinations.

If this be accepted, good is in being free to follow our inclinations ; evil in being compelled or bound to act against them. On what authority does this principle rest?

Moreover, is it certain that poverty, in itself considered, is evil, or opposed to our destiny? Where is the proof? What, then, is the real distinction between wealth and poverty?

Where draw the line, so that the rich shall all be on one side, and all the poor on the other? John Jacob Astor is said, when told of a man who had just retired from business with half a million, to have remarked, that he had no doubt but the poor man might be just as happy as if he were rich!

To John Jacob Astor, the man worth half a million was a poor man ; to most men, he would be a rich man. One man counts himself poor, in the possession of thousands ; another feels himself rich, if he have a coarse serge robe, a crust of bread, and water from the spring.

Which of the two is the rich, which the poor man? But pass over this difficulty. Many emperors, kings, princes, nobles, and innumerable saints, have voluntarily abandoned wealth, and chosen poverty, even made a solemn vow never to have any thing to call their own.

Is it certain that these have acted a foolish part, abandoned good, and inflicted evil on themselves? If not, how can you say poverty is in itself an evil?

Do you say, poverty breeds discontent, and leads to vice and crime? Is that true? Does it do so in all men who are poor? Did it do so in St.

Anthony, St. Francis of Assisium, St. John of God, St. Thomas of Villanova, St. Are all the poor discontented, vicious, and criminal?

No man dares say it. Was wealth a good to the rich man mentioned in the Gospel? Was poverty an evil to the poor man that lay at his gate full of sores, begging to be fed with the crumbs that fell from his table?

We might go through the whole list of physical evils drawn up by the Associationists, and ask, in relation to each, so far as it is physical, the same or similar questions.

Whence, then, the certainty that what they propose to remove, as evil, is evil? Whence, then, the proof that the end they propose is a good end?

Suppose - and the case is supposable - that what are called physical evils are dispensed by a merciful Providence, designed to be invaluable blessings, and are such to all who receive and bear them with the proper dispositions ; could we then pronounce them evils?

Now this may be the fact. If it is, then the good or the evil depends on ourselves, and we may make them either blessings or curses, as we choose.

Then to remove evil would not necessarily be to remove them, but to cure that moral state which makes a bad, instead of a good, use of them.

It is easy to declaim, but it is important that we declaim wisely ; and to be able to declaim wisely, we must know what to declaim against.

It is easy to harrow up the feelings by eloquent descriptions of physical sufferings, and no doubt physical sufferings are often an evil of no small magnitude ; but this is nothing to the purpose.

Is the evil in the physical suffering itself, or in the moral state of him who causes or suffers it? Suppose we transport ourselves to the early ages of our era, and take our stand in proud, haughty, imperial, and pagan Rome ; suppose we assist at the trial, tortures, and martyrdom of the persecuted Christians, behold them cast to the wild beasts in the amphitheatre, see them broiling slowly on gridirons, their flesh torn off with pincers, or their living bodies stuck full of splinters besmeared with pitch, lighted, and ranged along the streets of the city by night, as so many lamps.

Here is physical pain. Yet what is it that excites our horror? Not at all. We glory in it; we bless God for it ; and so do the sufferers themselves.

They choose it, voluntarily submit to it, and joy in the midst of it, and would not have it less for all the world.

There is no joy on earth so sweet, so great, so ecstatic, as that of the martyr. The horror we feel is not at the physical suffering, but at the malice which inflicts it, -not at the fact that the martyrs are enabled heroically to win their crowns, but at the refined cruelty which delights to torture them.

Their presence, then, is not necessarily an evil to the sufferer, and consequently exemption from them not necessarily a good.

We are told, at one time, that man's destiny is, to live in harmony,-that is, in association as they propose to organize it. But this is no answer; for it only asserts, in other words, that man is able or fitted by nature to adopt the means of fulfilling his destiny.

The final cause of man is, then, to assist the Creator in completing the work of creation, that is, that he may constitute a portion of the First Cause!

This, however, we understand to be only a fanciful speculation, for which the school, as it exists in this country, does not hold itself responsible.

We can find no specific answer. But they lay down, as their grand principle, Attkactions proportional to destiny. If, then, we assert that they hold, that, when man has developed and satisfied in harmony his primitive or fundamental passions, or stimulants, as M.

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